It’s Not My Job: The Attitude That’s Killing Your Career

by | Jun 30, 2011 | Career Limiting Habits Series

This article is the second in a 10-part series on the topic of overcoming career-limiting habits.

10 Career-Limiting Habits: Are You Guilty?

In a recent study identifying the most common career-limiting habits, “It’s Not My Job” came in second place.

This attitude is so prevalent in the workplace and, if you’ve ever worked with a person like this, you know how frustrating it can be. This is not the mindset of a team player. This is someone who is simply checking the box—doing the minimum required to collect a paycheck and unwilling to stretch beyond their tiny little bubble.

Okay, perhaps I’m oversimplifying things. But that’s how it looks.

Here’s the truth: We all have to set limits in the workplace. You have a job. Your tasks and responsibilities are clearly defined. You can’t simply take on everything people throw at you. There are some things that truly are NOT your job; it’s your responsibility to set appropriate boundaries when needed.

I think this career-limiting habit is referring to the overall mindset of people who unreasonably resist taking on additional work even when it’s truly needed for the success of the team. There are times when we all have to do a little more to support others, even if it’s not specifically a part of our job description. That’s what it means to be on a team. Ultimately, at some point in the future, your teammates will do the same for you.

So how can you appropriately set limits without falling victim to the “It’s Not My Job” mentality? Here are some tips:

Pitch in and help others out when you can.

If you have the time and capability to do a little something extra to help out a team member, do it. Remember that there’s no harm in acknowledging that you’re doing him or her a favor, but don’t expect a perfect one-to-one exchange of favors. It won’t always happen that way.

Set limits for the right reasons.

It’s perfectly okay to say “no” in the workplace. However, there are good reasons (I’m at full capacity already, I’m not trained on that procedure, etc.) and there are bad ones (It’s not my job). Make sure that you’re setting limits for a valid purpose, not simply because you don’t feel like being a team player. Give a heartfelt and honest explanation about why you can’t help right now, but also avoid making overly lengthy excuses.

When setting limits, be helpful.

“It’s not my job,” is probably the most unhelpful sentence uttered in the workplace. It’s like a toddler screaming, “No! I don’t have to and you can’t make me!” It doesn’t do anyone any good. If you have to say no, show a sincere desire to resolve the problem. Offer alternatives and help find solutions. Come up with a few suggestions of how the work can get done without you.

Make it your job.

If you find that you’re constantly being asked to take on a task that truly isn’t in your job description, address it with management. Perhaps this should be your job. Perhaps you should have some authority and responsibility for it. Maybe you deserve a little added compensation as well. What a wonderful opportunity to discuss your role, re-evaluate your contributions, and demonstrate your willingness to go above and beyond for the team.

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About the Author

Chrissy Scivicque is a certified Project Management Professional (PMP) and certified Professional Career Manager (PCM). She is an author, in-demand presenter and international speaker known for engaging, entertaining, educating and empowering audiences of all sizes and backgrounds. Learn more here.

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